Hidden Truths

While I’ve written a handful of Dramas, I’ve found that the storylines are difficult to uncover. As with any blanket statement, there are exceptions such as Second Chance and Simple Pleasures. But I’m always game for a challenge, so last Saturday I started trying to work through a storyline, but after many false starts I went to NYC Midnight and searched for a prompt for the Drama narrative that refused to start. Armed with the very basics of a hotel foyer and a bag of flour, my mind instantly latched onto Angel and the hotel they eventually selected to use as the base of their operation.

Then I dove into a name generator and started selecting a series of names for the characters. Once I had a list of four names, the story leapt to the forefront of my mind. The rough outline for the piece flew from my fingertips, and with each pass over the narrative I refined it until I was ecstatic with the story. Sit down and get comfortable as we follow Randy and Cedric and their search of the abandoned hotel.

Randy and Cedric are searching an abandoned hotel for their boss’s missing gemstones. Will they uncover the stash that Isabella left with…

Hidden Truths

Randy’s eyes rose over the counter, and they flitted between the cobwebs, falling ceiling tiles, and cracked walls. He leaned down and blew the dust off the concierge’s bell. Randy’s head whipped about as he inched out from behind the front desk, scratching his ear. “Where did that woman hide the boss’s stuff?”

“You didn’t think she’d make it easy for us, did you?”

Randy lifted a brass canister, turning it upside down, and threw it across the foyer. As it clanged against the floor, Randy kicked the upended trash. “Cedric, we’ve searched the entire hotel, and the only thing we have accomplished is to waste our time.”

“Why do you constantly overreact?” Cedric snapped his fingers and sauntered down the stairs. “We entered the building about ten minutes ago.”

With a dismissive wave of his hand, Randy hustled to a side door, flinging it open. He stepped inside, placed the bell on the cabinet, and pulled his phone out, activating its flash. “We’ve been scouring this place for longer than that. Can’t you let me complain?”

“No, because our business here wasn’t our choice.”


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